Voters are getting involved in the 2018 midterm elections!

The Pew Research Center recently released a new study providing some evidence that participation in the 2018 primary elections appears to be higher than it was in the last midterm U.S. federal election, back in 2014.  This indicates that American voters are interested and engaged in the 2018 elections, in particular on the Democratic side.

The study, “Turnout in this year’s U.S. House primaries is up, especially on the Democratic side”, looks at turnout across the nation, in primary elections that have been held so far this year.  Here’s the key graph from the Pew study.

FT_18.07.21_PrimaryTurnout_2

As you can see, the Pew analysis shows that voter participation in primaries so far in 2018 has been substantially greater in U.S. House, U.S. Senate, and state Governor, primary elections relative to 2018.  While turnout is up for voters from both parties, the increases in turnout between 2014 and 2018 look a bit greater among Democratic voters than among Republican voters.

Seeing increased voter participation, in particular in a U.S. midterm election, is a good thing — it indicates that among registered voters that there is likely more interest in the election, and more enthusiasm about the electoral process.  We like seeing more people are getting involved in civic affairs, in particular the important act of voting.

If these trends continue, we think that Magnify offers a great way for you (or your organization) to take advantage of increased interest, enthusiasm, and engagement, in civic affairs.  Whether your issue or project is national in scope, or whether it a project that involves your neighbors along your street, Magnify gives you a means to connect with and to organize your community to get things done.

Try Magnify today — lets work together to build stronger communities and make progress getting problems in our neighborhoods, cities, and nation, resolved.  We can do it by connecting with our communities, and getting their help in solving these problems.  If as part of that process, we also strengthen civic enthusiasm and  community engagement among our friends, family, neighbors, and colleagues at work, all the better.